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and a grand lady from louisiana, lindy boggs. she was a pioneer. she served the second congressional district following the death of her husband who was then the majority leader of the house. husband, h lambings e boggs. she was the first woman to represent the state of louisiana in congress and founder of the congresswoman's caucus. mr. scalise: in tribute to her service as a pioneer for women, the congressional women's reading room is rightfully named in her honor down the hall. she was the first woman and only louisiana ambassador to the holy see in the tenure of pope john paul ii. lindy effortlessly balanced her role as a respected leader and loving mother. she loved her city of new orleans, in fact, lived on bourbon street for many of her later years in new orleans. she loved her beloved tulane university and in fact, just recently, she and her daughter cokie participated in a benefit for tulane university in new orleans. she's somebody who will be dearly missed and somebody who we are honored to have, to be able to call a former colleague of ours here in the house. with that, i yield ba
: a fox news alert and the alert is that it's dark outside as well as this, a hostage at a louisiana bank over. the gunman had been killed. >> kidnapped teen hannah anderson breaking her silence on-line how she says abductor james dimaggio tricked her. >>brian: dad, does this look familiar? the concert your kids are dying to go to. what's the experience like for you, because you don't want them to go alone? we have got the pictures of what parents have to go through to keep their kids happy and safe. "fox & friends" starts now. ♪ >> you're watching "fox & friends." >> what was the hiccup for? >>gretchen: i guess they thought i had a night on the town before. maybe you did because you're back. >>brian: i'm back from vacation and we're in a temporary studio. we can see people outside for the first time since 1974. >>gretchen: two people. >>brian: all these people saying why am i up, but here we go. huge three-hour show still on this couch which is a little bit low. i feel like this is children's furniture. >>gretchen: i like this sofa. my legs finally reach the bottom after seven years. >
're talking about keeping people like that for 20 some years, a couple of decades, louisiana, they have a record, a couple of guys, wallace and woodfox have been looked up over 40 years. >> even john mccain, who suffered in vietnam has said that he doesn't believe that extended solitary confinement makes sense. >> i don't believe in solitary confinement is good either. but that's not the situation in california. it's torture. that would be the truth. solitary confinement would be torture. >> so you believe that solitary confinement, the way its used in some of the super max prisons in the country is torture? >> i haven't seen that myself, but i would say that as john mccain experienced it, in the prison cells in vietnam, that's torture, and i don't know for a fact that's what's happening in america. >> take it from me. making somebody live in a small confine of a space that's no larger than a car's parking space or small bathroom, that's torture. try it for 12 years. >> we have questions -- >> may i make a point about the suicides? they happen in cells, but ut individuals locked in thos
from louisiana seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent for five legislative days for members to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. pursuant to house resolution 315 and rule 18, the chair declares the house in committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration-h.r. 1582. will the gentleman from kansas, mr. yoder, kindly take the chair. the chair: the house is in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of h.r. 1582, which the clerk will report by title. the clerk: a bill to protect consumers by prohibiting the administrator of the environmental protection agency from promulgating as final certain energy related rules that will cost more than $1 billion and cause significant adverse effects to the economy. the chair: when the committee of the whole house on the state of the union rose on wednesday, july 31, 2013, a request for a recorded vote on amendment number 3 pribt -- printed in house report 113-174 offered by the gentleman from virginia, mr. conn
to south carolina. go back to georgia, go back to louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities. knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friend friends -- [ cheers and applause ] >> -- though even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up, live out the true meaning of its creed. we hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal. i have a dream that one day on the red hills of georgia, sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of
of potentially deadly toxic chemicals forcing the evacuation of about 100 homes in central louisiana. sodium hydroxide which could be deadly if inhaled or touched reportedly leaking from a train car that derailed. a second car is leaking lubricant oil. the leaks have been contained, and the amounts were reportedly small. a tonight of 20 union pacific train cars jumped those tracks. >>> the muslim brotherhood spiritual leader, his deputy and another key figure will be on trial this month to allegedly inciting members to kill leaders in the outing to mohamed morsi's being forced out. >>> a search for a 25-year-old snowboarder. 12 people using chainsaws moved tons of da brie to finally locate his body. he was snowboarding with five friends saturday when an ice tunnel collapsed crushing him beneath a block of ice the size of a school bus. >>> this frightening video tells the tale, firefighters lucky to be alive. a captain realized the house was seconds from collapsing, radioed the warning and those firefighters got away just in time. only minor injuries were reported. we'll have more for you on
claiming that the members host: that is an "politico" this morning. we began with a call from louisiana on our republican line. linda, who would you like to see nominated? >> i tell you what, i think any of our servicemen should be awarded. disappointed on some of the names. oprah winfrey has never done anything for anybody's freedom. she has, like obama, only done her share to divide the country. i am sick and tired of all the commotion going on in washington with obama. as far as i'm concerned, he does not even have the right to award anybody anything. he needs to be out of office. is linda in louisiana. this is james in rome, georgia. democrats line. medal: i would award the of honor to all of the peacemakers, the people who are trying to stop these wars that are going on. what you learn from this -- the peacemakers are the ones who shall inherit the earth. all you hear about it the republicans talking about warmongering. john mccain interfering in other people's business and things. need a department of peace. thank you. host: some of the other recipients that president obama has aw
-old in louisiana shot and killed his 90-year-old caregiver as she watched television. police report the boy had just finished playing the video game grand theft auto. are violent media affecting kids and making them violent. joining us, the doctor from our fine medical aid team. thanks for joining us this morning. that is the question, the piece in the "new york times" this week that said most researchers agree violent media do have an effect on media, do increase the predilection to violence. >> i think focusing on violent media misses the greater problem, which is media. we are deploying, whether through facebook or reality tv lots of ways for people to not be in reality, to not feel their feelings. yes, violent video games are part of that problem, because you can't maintain the connection and have a real reality while being wrenched into virtual reality. it does not work. human beings do not have that capacity, at least some of the outliers among us do not. >> so you're saying that as we're basically anesthetizing our kids with television or video games that aren't able to process how they
report 113-187 in the following order, amendment number one by mr. scalise of louisiana, amendment number three by mr. smith ofs missouri, amendment number four by mr. latham of iowa, amendment number six by mr. nadler of new york, amendment of r eight by mr. johnson georgia, amendment by ms. jackson lee of texas, and amendment by ms. moore of wisconsin. the unfinished request is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number one printed in house report 113-187 offered by mr. scalise of louisiana on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number one printed in house report 113-18 , offered by mr. scalise of louisiana. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having risen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any
by the transportation system. louisiana talking to a manufacturer of our masuda goals, he told me were the most important things was getting those things from the market. he stopped. i said i'm in the transportation business. we are all in a transportation business. we have to get the cereal in the milk out in the morning. she was touched by the system. it will cost more for the milk. it impacts us all. in the last congress, we made some good progress. i think there are some very good reforms. we are still slowly getting the information. secretary fox will be here later today. i am encouraged. we had dinner the other night. he had dinner with several republicans. we had a great conversation. i look forward to it i did. it is always a positive thing. sometimes you have to leave politics at the door and get things done. i'm sure you will appreciate what the secretary has to say. they gave us a poor grade. we are at a point where we have got to figure out how to do this anyway that keeps us competitive in the world. there is a federal role. working with the state and the local governments. when yo
in louisiana. >> it's gone from bourgeois critique of african-american men's behavior to legislators saying there's some correlation between the way one dresses and the way in which crimes occur. i come from a background around sexual violence and we know women are policed around dressing. it's really problematic or sexist correlation between a woman wearing a mini skirt and she gets raped. >> if you're wearing a mini skirt you deserve to get raped, wearing a hoodie, deserve to get shot. at the table here, it's easy this comes from the outside, rush limbaugh or fox news saying this. but we were together at the essence festival, vastly african-american room, you said some things about how you should dress when you go meet the principal of the school of your kid, the applause, ovation, people were like, that's right, you've got to do right when you go see the principal. this resonates in african-american communities. >> we try to intellectualize to get back to the issues. we have to acknowledge racism is bigger than the way you dress. however, if you come to see me as the principal in spongeb
thinks people in his party come across as too mad. louisiana governor bobby jindal. and scott walker from wisconsin. he took on a union and lived to tell about it. you have two candidates who came up short in 2012. two ricks. texas governor rick perry and rick santorum. both gearing up rit now. then there is some big known types. the veteran, running mate in 2012, paul ryan and jeb bush whose both dad and brother were president. so they could make lots of money fund-raising and have a national network. all, for now, are judged against one another in a republican context. but because of how unified democrats are around hillary, they are all measured against her too. and three years of this, jamie. >> we are all set now. thank you, carl. >> three years. time flies. . it will good by like that. >>> big changes could soon be coming to some of your favorite foods as scientists tryout some new types of grub that were created entirely in a lab. we'll explain. >> and what do you call a kid who says jeopardy cheated him? alex? ♪ ♪ ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...so you say men are superior driv
" columnist and distinguished fellow. robert mann, professor at louisiana state university and author of "the walls of jericho," walter fields, now executive editor of northstarnews.com, black public affairs news and website. jack rosin that wi rosenthal, j department aide to robert f. kennedy. thank you for joining us. bob, i was struck by "meet the press" 50 years ago this sunday. the automatic sumgts if black people are coming to washington, d.c., they're militant. >> militant negros, look out. to me part of the problem with over what has happened in the past half century, despite all the progress that has been made, i think not nearly enough, i think that there are not enough militant negros out there marching or do whatever else -- doing whatever else is necessary to bring economic justice, which was the underlying theme -- actually not so underlying theme of the original march on washington. i think that's one of the reasons blacks are having such a hard time right now. >> jack, i wondered, you were there in the justice department, being part of the preparations for really -- just take
the car. >> brian: louisiana, followed by alabama. congratulations, weird people. >> tucker: worst food, coming in at number one, and by the way, this is well deserved with all respect, alaska. >> brian: how many different ways can you make cod? >> ainsley: then mississippi, then alabama. >> tucker: have you been to high land foreign grill outside birmingham? >> brian: is this a push back on the study? >> tucker: this is a push back. >> ainsley: how about drunkest state? what do you think it is? louisiana, florida, california? where is nevada on there. >> tucker: what about maine? come on. >> ainsley: the rudest state. come on! who did they ask? new york? >> tucker: yeah. that's the foulest area. >> ainsley: shocker. new york, new jersey, then california. >> brian: if you get a chance to see people in california, they do seem rude. nicest state, georgia, minnesota or hawaii? all nice people and nice looking states. >> tucker: they're all nice. the cost of insurance is rising with obamacare a lot. what if there was a way around that? meet the doctor who saved one patient $17,000 by not u
in the watergate scandal, but another 30 scandal laid out in this. host: we of a call coming in from louisiana. independent calller. good morning, david. caller: who did nixon convince to take us off the gold standard? the film does not get into the specifics of his economic policies. so i really could not comment. democratic calller. caller: i of a question concerning the campaign in 18 -- 1968. how did you handle the coverage of those campaigns, which were extremely close? guest: the film does not cover the campaigns at all. it begins with his inauguration, which is the initial material available to us. they did not begin until the administration begins. the basis for the films being available to us, the basis being public domain is they were confiscated as materials created by employees of the white house while they were working for the president. so there is nothing in the collection that we obtained and made the foam out of that predated the inauguration. campaign, the 1972 campaign is very much a part of the movie because they were period.during that perit debut inth the film tonight, th
a call coming in from louisiana. independent calller. good morning, david. caller: who did nixon convince to take us off the gold standard? guest: the film does not get into the specifics of his economic policies. so i really could not comment. advisers of economic recommended that policy. host: democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i have a question concerning the campaign. how did you handle the coverage of those campaigns, which were extremely close? guest: the film does not cover the campaigns at all. it begins with his inauguration, which is the initial material available to us. they did not begin until the administration begins. the basis for the films being available to us, the basis being public domain is they were confiscated as materials created by employees of the white house while they were working for the president. so there is nothing in the collection that we obtained and made the film out of that pre-dated the inauguration. the second campaign, the 1972 campaign is very much a part of the movie because they were filming during that period. host: with the film debut in tonig
. margaret is from port allen, louisiana on our republican line. your take on that issue of cantor saying that the real problem is entitlements, not sequestration? entitlements -- social security, medicare, the seniors pay for that and the little bit they get on is not enough. what they need work on is the welfare and social programs. explain. keep going. i understand some people needed. they need help. but you have somebody people out there that i know that do not need help, they are just lazy. host: do you think of that is biggest -- do you think that is the biggest budget challenge facing the country right now? caller: that and illegals on the welfare programs. billion a year? host: where did you get that number? caller: i will have to look at the site. programs --elfare caller: the welfare social programs. john is from jackson, new jersey on our independent line. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i have been listening to all of these politicians on the radio and tv. to get itlly seems and talk about the real problem. $1000 and i are making per week and your family is ng $1400
a louisiana newspaper. -- for presenter won't run for be election -- representative alexander won't lection.re-e meeting might decide fate of visit.utin secretary of state john kerry and defense secretary will meet with their counterparts on friday in washington to talk about a number of issues. they say at the top of the list are difficult questions that are sure to be the status of the meeting between mr. obama and mr. putin, which has been in doubt for weeks because of issues that include russia's refusal to return edward snowden united states to face charges of leaking national security secrets. that is a reporter from the new york times. a reporter from the washington post pokes fun. there is an editorial cartoon. putin is saying to edward snowden, here is a whistle you can blow whenever you see a gay person. there are stricter laws against homosexual people in russia. jonathan has written extensively about the issue of nsa surveillance for pro-publica. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. you might have been listening in. we have had a couple of questions about the extent of the
a retirement on capitol hill. there is a headline from a louisiana newspaper. representative alexander won't run for re-election. meeting might decide fate of obama-putin visit. secretary of state john kerry and defense secretary will meet with their counterparts on friday in washington to talk about a number of issues. they say at the top of the list are difficult questions that are sure to be the status of the meeting between mr. obama and mr. putin, which has been in doubt for weeks because of issues that include russia's refusal to return edward snowden united states to face charges of leaking national security secrets. that is a reporter from the new york times. a reporter from the washington post pokes fun. there is an editorial cartoon. putin is saying to edward snowden, here is a whistle you can blow whenever you see a gay person. there are stricter laws against homosexual people in russia. jonathan stray has written extensively about the issue of nsa surveillance for pro- publica. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> you might have been listening in. we have had a couple
and german flak batteries. >> host: of world war ii veteran living in lafayette, louisiana. you're on book tv with author rick atkinson. >> caller: they misquoted you. i'm not a veteran of that war, but i wanted to pay tribute, if i could, to some dear friends of mine who are gone now his name is go down in history. they were very -- my engineer was one of the 802nd and 101st airborne paratroopers that was at normandie. on never forget the tears in his eyes when he said, yes, our nation was to take the guns. i lost about 100 of my friends doing so, and there were not even there. then he went to market garden where he was not mortally wounded because she lived through it, but seriously wounded in taking a bridge, the last bridge. and my uncle who was in patton's army throughout the campaign and lived through it and left his general but said this of his soldiers. we have a serious problem with people shooting themselves in the foot. he was actually incensed about it. that's why he slapped the man. he loved his general. he said a lot of our boys died, but not because we weren't fighting. >> host
baton rouge, louisiana. caller: good morning. i think we should absolutely do nothing. we get into much trouble if we stick our noses in where they do not belong. they didn't do anything to us, we shouldn't do anything to them, and it will solve no problems. hitler did not use poison gas and world war ii. the british and americans had read -- had it ready to go. host: a few stories i want to note for you this morning, this is from "the usa today," -- one other interesting story. here is a piece from "the washington times" -- that story has a picture of john hickenlooper. they are facing a secession movement in his state. left ona few minutes the question we are posing to our quests -- to our viewers. how should the u.s. respond in syria? ryan is up next on our independent line in maryland. good morning. i think it is time for america to stand back and let the nature of all course of her. think obama, if he gets in on this intervention, what happens again is we forget all of the innocent civilians. no one is calling a spade a spade in this situation. there has been a lot of deaths attrib
, louisiana. go ahead you are on. caller: we don't care about people getting gas. run any deals on the sex the of the children who suffered agent orange in vietnam. off sincery is better we have been bombing them over the last 20 years? >> welcome to the show, tony. uest: >> >> guest: it seems we really don't care about those people over there. we do care about countries like israel. i care about the country of israel also. i don't care about the government of israel. i believe -- one minute we're calling all those folks over there terrorists, the next minute we care about them so much. this needs to stop because it is just going to backfire on this country and all hell is going to break loose in the middle east and we are going to be responsible for. it needs to stop. >> guest: listen, i teach at the presidents on the modern here in new york. i want to bring out a point, just a commonsense point. martin luther king who believed ,n nonviolence, if esau obama he would turn over in his grave. this is the situation. we are sending 100 houston male soldiers and female soldiers to afghanistan,
from louisiana to our school in washington because we do not have any. i want to say i have a personal story here. she turned 56 today. on that day in 1963, we all sat down on the floor in our living room and watched a black and white tv. for a child that had turned six have ad that day -- birthday party, she wanted to speech,. king gave his even to the point that my father said, you've got to move your head, because her head was in the way. she was so enthralled. at one time i was suspended from king'sbefore dr. birthday became a holiday. people thealled night before. because theschool schools in seattle were leaving at 12:00. the told me into the office. there was a big ruckus. me fors they suspended gathering people together during school in honor of dr. king. so yes, it has changed. i also want to say that i am appalled at the way the statesnt of these united is treated. to be called a liar in the halls of congress is an abomination. host: thank you for the call from washington. we have this point on our twitter page. king came to washington as part of a demonstration on racial and
, it's massachusetts. it's louisiana which is sort of unique in some ways. we'd all have a debate about whether it's good or bad, what's happening in louisiana. and that doesn't bring, the small school thing is in that mix. it's nested in that mix. what does a school day well? what would be better to farm out to a larger entity. you don't have a lot of that farming out in a lot of state digital have so much in california. you don't have so much in new jersey that superintendent sharing program is interesting, and hopefully someone will study that. but i think that's where you would want to move. are the things that a small school can do well, and then how large do the other entities have to get to take on certain tasks in order to be effective? >> again, i think your paper and the position that 105s doesn't fit all is right thing to take. interdistrict may work in some places, but then there has to be real choice if it's going to be the case but it has to be about quality and has to be about kids as opposed to the politics that we see floating around choice now. and the places that we w
to turn now to as prats who's the director of emergency preparedness for the louisiana department of health and hospitals. that puts her smack in the middle of coordinating among federal, state and local agencies that are dealing with and preparing for that disaster this type. she has a rich and various background and health administration roles. she was around during the katrina days and has been around the department more than 20 years. we are really pleased to have you with us today. >> be sure i've got this right. can you hear me? all right. well good afternoon. i think i was one of the last panelists to be picked up on this very distinguished panel. so i thought i would talk to you from what i know in terms of my strength is more in obligations. usually i never had a loss for words. from an operations perspective if you told me, you know, that the problem is katrina, rita, gustav, ike, the oil spill. they're some of the operation concerns we have. if you said okay how are we going to evacuate have the coast line and a 32 hour period i know who to go to and how long it's going
to take over black cities in louisiana doing the same thing in michigan. we will not have the kind of turnout we've had in previous years unless we take your -- make sure we add emergency managers and the suppressions. to the list of voter suppression. >> i would like to -- >> jo ann watson. >> yes, sir? >> counselwoman from detroit. give her a round of applause. we have to challenge the constitutionality of the emergency manager law, which suspends every elected official from voting. as he said himself, he's a benevolent dictator. [inaudible] right. we need to organize at the national level, because what is happening in michigan can happen -- >> emergency management. [inaudible] >> department of justice, i think, moving with us but they haven't acted on it yet. sorry to say. >> congressman john? >> we have similar things taking place in georgia in the dekalb county. the school board has been removed by the governor. he's replaced them with his own pick. and these kinds of moves have been sanctioned by the voters. so when they put constitutional amendments on the ballot, and they t
, louisiana, arkansas. so dangerous amounts of heat out there. north of the storm system, we have some cooler air. temperatures widespread, in the 70s. low average, not feeling very august like in parts of minnesota. 75 degrees will be the high temperature today in minneapolis. let's head back inside. >> steve: all right. thank you very much. as has been the tradition here on "fox & friends," during internships, the last day of a college student's intern shall, they actually get to be on television and today we say so long, ali, has been with us all summer long. have you enjoyed your internship? >> absolutely. it was amazing. >> steve: you're sick of us and you're ready to go back to college, right? >> no. very excited to go back. but very sad to leave. >> steve: you're going to do the sports. stand right here in the official sportsman position. here is ali with the sports. >> thank you. the cubs getting unlikely production from newcomer donny murphy. in just his third game with the team, murphy cracked two homeruns and drove in four as the cubs beat the phillies 5-2. murphy seems to have fou
to negotiate with a guy named napoleon bonaparte. he negotiated the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of the united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace prize because he mediated the russo japanese war in 1905. fdr's wartime diplomacy secured and allies for churchill, stalin. that was political to overcoming the power to president kennedy turned the diplomacy when the great majority of his advisers in october 1952 said use force. at the final moment president kennedy brokered a negotiated compromise with our greatest enemy, the soviet premier make you tricshelle, that's how the cuban missile crisis ended. that's why we didn't and centric hundreds of millions of people on the east coast, the midwest of united states and in europe, and in russia. because diplomacy rather than force triumphs. think of henry kissinger, still going strong at age 90 by the way, 40 years ago negotiate his brilliant opening to china that open up relations that have been frozen for the last 20 years prior, and insured a generation of peace between china and t
and our disaster resilience series which cohosted with the pennington foundation of baton rouge, louisiana. for those of you interested in the series i would encourage you to visit our website, csis.org to learn more about those events including interviews and videos. natural disasters represent a significant challenge. on average we experience 10 severe weather events each year, exceeding $1 billion in damage. in the 1980s the annual average was only two such even events. in 2012 alone disastrous cost the u.s. an estimated $110 billion making it the second most costly year in disasters in recent decades. adjusting disasters and the cost goes will acquire us to -- our long-term efforts to build resilience for communities, businesses, government agencies and individuals are better prepared for and can recover more quickly and more fully from natural disasters. to discuss how we can make building and resilient nation more effective and more of a priority, we're joined today by dissing bush panel of experts. first i would like to introduce david heyman who'll be living a few opening remarks.
to as many as six or seven refineries from kansas, oklahoma, texas to louisiana. there is no doubt the vast majority of not 100% of the gasoline will be distributed within the united states and not put on. but there have been -- we do export diesel because we don't use it like europe does so we have had a symbiotic relationship. we send them our diesel and they send us our gasoline. so, that would continue. also some of the manufacturing products that are bipartisan from the oil that we don't use would be exported, too. those are actually healthy for our economy. >> host: in issue that does affect nebraska but you don't necessarily think of it when you talk about immigration. how does it affect nebraska and where are you personally on emigration? >> guest: it does affect nebraska. we have a lot of plants and agriculture but to rely on and we have had a good share of immigrants in both omaha and my district as well as other cities throughout nebraska so we need reform and make them attack that issue. where i am and i think this is the consensus of the republican conference, too. it's hard to
another 670 million dollars from the boondoggle of the louisiana purchase that was included in the original bill. repealed or changed portions of the affordable care act signed into law by the president of the united states. we have heard heart-wrenching stories by our friends on the other sides about help challenges and illnesses. yes, mr. speaker, there are challenges out there. as a physician i can attest to that, spending 20 years taking care of asians. but americans do not want washington deciding what kind of healthcare they can have or should have. we need patients, families, and doctors making those decisions. it would be preposterous to say that republicans do not like affordable care, quality care, accessible care. nonsense, mr. speaker. nonsense. what we want is the highest quality of care that respects the principles of affordability and accessibility and choices and responsiveness and innovation. simply what patients and families and doctors to be in charge of healthcare. not washington, d.c. and not the irs. >> the house went on to pass that bill, the 232 to 18
by the transportation system. in louisiana talking to a manufacturer of our masuda goals, he told me were the most important things was getting those things from the market. he stopped. i can pull this out. i said i'm in the transportation business. we are all in a transportation business. we have to get the serial in the milk out in the morning. she was touched by the system. it will cost more for the milk. it impacts us all. we made some good progress. i think there are some very good reforms. we are still slowly getting the information. secretary fox will be here later today. i am encouraged. we had dinner the other night. i didn't know was several republicans. we had a great conversation. i look forward to it i did. it is always a positive thing. it sometimes you have to leave politics at the door and get things done. i'm sure you will appreciate with the signature has to say. they gave us a poor grade. we are at a point where we have got to figure out how to do this anyway that keeps us competitive in the world. there is a federal role. working with the state and the local governments. when y
the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace brise -- prize because he mediated in 19 50s. that was critical to overcome the act of power. president kennedy turned the diplomacy when the great majority of the advisers in october of 1962, said use force. at the final moment, president kennedy brokered a negotiated comprise with our greatest enemy the soviet. that's how the cuban missile crisis ended. that's how we didn't destroy hundreds and millions of people on the east coast, in europe, and russia. because diplomacy rather than force triumphed. henry kissinger going strong at the age of 90, by the way, forty years ago, negotiated his brilliant opening to china that opened up relations that have been frozen football the last twenty years prior and insure -- ensured a jen generation of peace. think of president bush. a lot of people think he was the most established. he had are vast experience as a diplomat, he had faith in diplomacy, he had achieved the unification of germany in nato after the en
diplomacy over several years to negotiate with a guy named napoleon bonaparte. he negotiated the louisiana purchase, which doubled the size of the united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace prize because he mediated the russo-japanese war in 1905. f.d.r.'s wartime diplomacy secured an alliance with churchill and stalin. that was critical in overcoming the axis of powers. president kennedy turned to diplomacy when the great majority of his advisors, in october, 1962, said use force. at the final moment president kennedy brokered a negotiated compromise with our greatest enemy, the soviet premiere nikita khrushchev, and that's how the cuban missile crisis ended and that's why we didn't incinerate hundreds of millions of people on the east coast and the midwest of the united states and in europe and in russia. because diplomacy, rather than force, triumphed. think of henry kissinger, still going strong at age 90, by the way. 40 years ago negotiated his brilliant opening to china that opened up relation that is have been frozen for the last
in the south like louisiana, mississippi. you know, what's happening in some of those states in terms of -- is that helping or hurting? >> that's a really important point. this is kind of one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. richard vedder is the expert on this who you'll hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have shunned the south other than texas. in fact, that's been a problem for growth in the south for a hundred, since the end of the civil war. now you're seeing dixie attracting the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states that has had the biggest percentage increase in immigration over last 15 years has been georgia. and georgia actually has become a high growth state. and this gets to the point people ask are immigrants more attracted to a state that has high welfare went fits -- benefits or to a state that has jobs. and so we rooked at some of -- we looked at some of this evidence, and what we found was on balance immigrants are much more likely to go to states with low unemployment rates than they are to go to the s
the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of the united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace prize to kasim mediated to russo-japanese war in 1905. fdr's wartime to pomc sera carried an alliance with churchill in stalin. president kennedy turned the diplomacy to win the great majority of his advisers and october 1962 saying use force at the final moment president kennedy brokered a negotiated compromise with our greatest enemy the soviet premier nikita khrushchev and that is how the cuban missile crisis ended and that is why we didn't incinerate hundreds of millions of people on the east coast in the midwest united states and in europe and russia because diplomacy rather than force triumphed. think of henry kissinger still going strong at age 90 by the way, 40 years ago negotiated his brilliant opening to china that opened up relations that have been frozen for the last 20 years prior and ensured a generation of peace between china and the united states rethink the president george h.w. bush, wash 41. a lot of people think he was
of louisiana is cut away. you cannot get there in more. and so all those supplies, the food, the manpower coming from the mississippi to the confederacy coming east stops. does not happen anymore. union controls the river. the other thing is the expert is of real hope. the growth coming from the east stopped at the river. things would come back for. that stopped because now the union army controls the railroad . they cut it on. you cannot underestimate the power of rage and real rooms during the civil war. it'd have trucks. it was reason gallons. the union army by capturing expert stops all that from that whole part of the country. the other part of this is now the mississippi river is wind up for the union army to use, the union need be used to transport material, man, food, equipment, whatever they needed to the south. it very definitely is the beginning of the end for the confederacy. a lot of people in the confederacy know this. there are "the book to that effect, but that is the history lesson. you have people like john pemberton. he is not a favorite sun. in fact, he's not a sign at
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